Posts Tagged ‘supplements’

Fibromyalgia and Food

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder that affects everyone a little differently. Therefore, promoting a one diet approach for every FM patient doesn’t make a lot of sense. However, according to Ginevra Liptan, MD, medical director of the Frida Center for FM in Portland, OR, it is clear that what is included in a diet vs. what is eliminated makes a big difference for many FM patients. It has been reported that 42% of FM patients surveyed indicated their symptoms worsened after eating certain foods. Here are some recommendations about diet to consider:

  1. Pay attention to how food makes YOU feel. Many FM patients have sensitivities to particular foods, but this is highly variable from person to person. Sensitivity to MSG, certain preservatives, eggs, gluten, and dairy are quite common. Keep a daily food journal for at least 2 weeks and write down the foods eaten and any associated symptoms like headaches, indigestion (irritable bowel syndrome irritation – IBS), or fatigue.
  2. Try Eliminating Certain Foods. Many FM patients have irritable bowel symptoms, and using an elimination diet can help determine which foods to cut out. Try it out for no less than 6-8 weeks in order to get the best results. Then, add it back into your diet and pay attention to how it makes you feel. The most commonly eliminated foods are dairy and gluten and the most common improvement is in fatigue reduction and reduced IBS symptoms like bloating and constipation.
  3. If you think you might have food sensitivities or allergies, talk with us.Sometimes it is best to obtain an evaluation from an allergist for food allergy testing. Dietitians can also assist in assuring that you don’t eliminate essential nutrients when foods are eliminated from the diet.
  4. Make it easier to Eat Healthy. Everyone, including the FM sufferer, should try to eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains (if not gluten sensitive), and lean meats or protein. A well balanced diet will give you more energy, which in turn, can improve your overall health. When pain and exhaustion are present, choose healthy foods that do not require a lot of preparation such as buying pre-washed vegetables, or purchase pre-prepared foods like beet salad and quinoa.
  5. Use Food to Help Fight Fatigue. Consume foods in a way that increases energy levels and prevent fatigue. Anecdotally, FM patients have reported that eating small meals frequently vs. restricting themselves to 3 meals a day can keep blood sugar levels more even and prevent the “hypoglycemic lows.” A snack high in protein around 3pm can prevent mid-day fatigue.  Make sure your breakfast includes some protein and whole grains (again, assuming there is no gluten sensitivity). Focus on getting enough sleep and staying active during the day as these can also prevent fatigue during the day.
  6. Check on Your Supplements. Some supplements have significant side effects and can interact with medications. Talk to the prescribing doctor or pharmacist about this. For example, antidepressants and certain supplements can interact.
  7. Focus on Your Overall Well-Being. A multiple approach to managing FM symptoms works better than a single approach. Things like yoga, massage, and deep breathing exercises, as well as routine chiropractic treatments can improve the overall quality of life. Increasing the quality of life is the ultimate goal for managing the FM patient. Going to bed at a consistent time, not eating too late, and exercising regularly are key components.

If you, a friend or family member requires care for FM, we sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence shown by choosing our services!

The Lazy Person’s Way To Weight Loss. Study Says: SLEEP MORE To Drop Pounds!

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Are you lazy? Come on. You can admit it and it will be our little secret! Well, even if you aren’t “lazy,” I’m sure you look for the quickest and easiest way to get things done. For example, if you had these two weight loss programs – that work equally as well – which one would you pick…

(1)You have to wake up at 5:00 a.m. every day and run 5 miles, then you eat almost nothing for breakfast, then almost nothing for lunch, then you work out like a dog for 2 hours after work, and eat a teeny tiny dinner. Then, you go to bed and do it all over again tomorrow. And you do this every day. Or…

(2) You take a pill, sleep late… and wake up skinny. Obviously, you’d probably choose #2. Any sane person would – as long as the “pill” was safe. Anyways, you get the point. Well, there is no “pill” that works like that. But, a study has just been published that claims sleeping is a very important part of weight loss.

In fact, research from the University of Chicago showed dieters who slept for 8.5 hours lost 55 percent more body fat than dieters who slept only 5.5 hours. The authors of the study stated, “Lack of sufficient sleep may compromise the efficacy of typical dietary interventions for weight loss and related metabolic risk reduction.”

Researchers think sleep may affect levels of a hormone called ghrelin. Increased levels of this hormone have been shown to increase appetite and increase fat retention. The subjects in this study who slept less claimed to be hungrier than those who slept more. According to the study’s authors:“Together, these results suggest that the loss of sleep at times of limited food intake amplifies the pattern of ghrelin associated changes in human hunger, glucose, fat utilization, and energy metabolism.” It should be noted the sample size in this study was small and further research on this subject is needed to make definitive conclusions.

Natural Pain Relief Ginger Supplements May Reduce Post Exercise Pain

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

A recent study published in The Journal of Pain found both raw and heat treated ginger reduced the pain associated with muscle injury when compared with a placebo. “The primary novel finding was that supplementation with both raw and heat-treated ginger attenuated muscle pain intensity 24 hours after eccentric exercise,” wrote the researchers, led by Chris Black, PhD, from Georgia College and State University. The researchers also added, “Consumption of raw ginger resulted in a 25 percent reduction while heat-treated ginger resulted in a 23 percent reduction in muscle-pain intensity 24 hours postexercise.” It is believed ginger may have anti-inflammatory and analgesic (pain killing) properties, similar to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.